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20130228
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the worst. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars strande
place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are calling on the presiden
abuse by priests. also, this week, the president of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops, cardinal timothy dolan of new york was formally questioned by lawyers for sex abuse victims. the deposition centered on dolan's handling of abuse while he oversaw the milwaukee archdiocese. >>> as president obama this week urged congress to prevent massive federal spending cuts from going into effect march 1st, many religious groups argued the so-called sequester would disproportionately impact low-income americans. although social security, medicare and some anti-poverty programs are protected, the groups pointed to likely cuts in programs that provide food and other assistance. they called those cuts unconscionable and immoral. >>> human rights and religious freedom advocates are ramping up pressure on iran to release an iranian-born american christian pastor who was recently sentenced to eight years in prison there. saeed abedini was convicted last month of threatening iran's national security by helping to expand the house church movement. 80 members of the u.s. congress wrote to secretary
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation cre
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
'm ready, coach, i'm locked in, i'm dedicated, committed for th next two years th team u.s.a. with you and whatever you need prefrom me i'm ready to do it. >> rose: here's what he said about you. roll tape. >> holy mackerel, carmelo, you're doing an interview with charlie rose. man, he's come a long way since learning how to play contesting defense for the u.s. team. but charlie, one of the great things, the things that makes carmelo such a fantastic basketball player is he's a war your, you know? he's as good a competitor as i coached in the seven years i've coached the u.s. national team. i love my relationship with him. he's multiing dimensional. he can play the three, four, or five for us. and he's a problem for anybody at all on these positions offensively. the cool thing and the great thing is he's strong enough, determined enough and smart enough to defend all three of those positions. the truly one of the great players in our game today. >> that's big coming from him. (laughs) >> rose: didn't get much bigger than that, does it? this is auy whs won t admiration of you and kobe a
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown everfour months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense propo
in --. >> in the middle of the night there was a theft. in europe and possibly japan in the u.s. these animals can go for many tens of thousands of dollars. >> rose: now the plow share tortoise was once thought to be extinct? >> it was once thoug to be extinc as are the case with many species of turtles and tortoises. >> rose: then they find something that says "no, they're not all gone." >> they were rediscovered in 1971 but prior to '97 71 only a handful had reached the western world. the species e.e.g. i don't gofy had been contracted to a tiny range and a remote part of madagascar so it was unclear if there were any left. so >> so if you had unlimited resources-- and you may as far as i kw-- >> i don't, trust me. >> rose: if you had more money could you do more? >> absolutely, sure. when you choose to protect a species it's almost like going into a war. you have to choose your battles and you have to figure out -- it's a horrible thing to say but you have to figure out where can you make a measurable difference? in the case of the plow share tortoise i thought i could make a difference. i thought
, michigan, my parents are not u.s. citizens. they ever's students, they're, they were here to do their medical training. they met in ann arbor and because of the first sentence of the 14th endment, great gift, the constitution gives a gift to peon my birthday, a birthday gift t makes me a citizen of the united states. >> because is with born here, no questions asked. and i think ever since, and i grew up as an immigrant kid, very much believing in america. my parents chose this place. they came here and i have been, i have this love affair with mark and its constitution and we have been trying ever since to repay the gift that it gave me. >> rose: when did you decide you wanted to be a cotitutionalcholar? >> thi in retrospect, you know, things seem obvious. but i think it was a process. i think there were three things that were key. when i was 10 years old my parents took me to see independence hall and the declaration of independence where it was drafted and the constitution. we went to the national archives. we went, hi lunch with my congressperson. and i visited mount vernon a
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)